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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
about whether a blind eye was turnedat scotland yard -- turned at scotland yard. >> for more on the uproar and the culture surrounding the british tabloids, i am joined by a reporter from london. thank you for joining me. coming from this side of the atlantic, is this a uniquely british phenomenon? >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you will get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best-selling newspaper. if you imagine "the national enquirer" was the best-selling newspaper in america, you would understand the situation here. >> they come up with stories that sailed very close to the legal edge. >> they have a culture that says get results whatever the cost. in a situation where circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers, that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line -- the at the line of journalism, as we have seen with these latest "news of the world" allegations. hacking into the phone of a child murder victim. i do not think many people would be shocked, be
for scotland yard. >> the murdochs are on the back foot. this is in the parlaiment and the power of the media. >> that is the latest from britain, where the pressure is mounting. the f.b.i. is probing allegations that newscorp tried to hack the phone records of victims of 9/11. concerns were raised by peter king, and joining him was democrat bruce brailey, who asked the house oversight committee to act. thank you for joining us. tyou say in your letter you have concerns about allegations that hacking extended to u.s. citizens. >> we do know there are concerns about the possibility that voicemails from 9/11 victims were obtained. there is a chance u.s. citizens may have had their emails accessed by newscorp. because of the alarm about this issue, i joined peter king and louise slaughter, from new york with a strong interest in protecting those victims. they are makin gsurg sure there is no violation of u.s. law, to provide the oversight the constitution requires. >> there was a possibility of victims of this. >> this is not a fishing expedition. the chair of the homeland security committee. th
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
bombing, still alive, almost two years after he was sent home from scotland with terminal cancer. al-megrahi. we found more of this supporters on the front line with the rebels. nato has not been able to get them to surrender. it has been bombing since march. nato aircraft have made more than 16,000 sorties. they have carried out more than 6000 air strikes. still, the colonel remains. four rebels in eastern libya, moammar gaddafi's fate is cause for argument. some insist he has no future inside his country. >> we understand the libyan people want him to leave the country and power, so this is our stand as of today. >> others suggest that the colonel does not have to go into exile. word that britain and france are prepared to let colonel gaddafi stay inside libya is seen by the supporters of the commonwealth as an admission that nato and the rebels cannot get rid of the libyan leader -- seen by the supporters of colonel gaddafi as an admission. giving up, long before the leader ever does. james reynolds, bbc news, in tripoli. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)